The Serengeti is the quintessential park for African Wildlife, probably even more than Kruger National Park in South Africa. The Serengeti National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

It came to the worlds attention when Bernhard Grzimek and his son Michael made their epic film "Serengeti darf nicht sterben" (Serengeti shall not die). I remember seeing this film as a child, and ever since wanted to see the Serengeti. Finally I was there in 2009. It was spectacular!!

The Serengeti is mostly open grassland with some acacias. Around the water courses is more vegetation, with brushes and palm trees. Some areas are a little more wooded.

The wildlife is extraordinary. I saw all the larger animals that you can expect, except rhinos. I was especially happy that I saw Southeast African Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus, german: Gepard, french: Guépard d'Afrique australe). I ended up seeing seven cheetahs, including a mother with four young cheetahs, who were dining on a Reedbuck.

The African Leopard (Panthera pardus pardus, german: Leopard, french: Léopard d'Afrique) that I saw had killed a Reedbuck and hauled it up into a tree. He was sitting in the tree with his meal.

I saw quite a few Southern Lions (Panthera leo melanochaita, german: Löwe, french: Lion). A couple of them were walking around a caravan of observation cars, completely ignoring them. I saw one lioness with a radio collar.

There are a lot of African Bush Elephants (Loxodonta africana, german: Afrikanischer Elefant, french: Éléphant de savane d'Afrique) in the Serengeti. At one time I saw an aggregation of something like 100 elephants.

The Western White-bearded Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi, german: Streifengnu, french: Gnou bleu) move around a lot, making their epic Wildebeest Migration. They were currently at Lake Ndutu, where I saw some of the herds. I even witnessed a Wildebeest stampede, they were spooked by some Spotted Hyenas (Crocuta crocuta, german: Tüpfelhyäne, french: Hyène tachetée).

Grant's Zebras (Equus quagga boehmi, german: Steppenzebra, french: Zèbre de Grant) usually move in the same areas as the Wildebeests. I saw a migrating herd of Zebras in the same area as the Wildebeests.

The Grant's Zebra does not require (but still prefers) short grass to graze on. It eats a wide range of different grasses, preferring young, fresh growth where available, and also browses on leaves and shoots from time to time. A zebra's digestive system works quickly and can extract more protein from the fibrous and poorest plant parts. Thus zebra are less picky in foraging but they do spend much time eating. Only after animals like zebras have cropped and trampled the long top grasses, which are low in protein, do the other grazers like Western White-bearded Wildebeests and Thompson's gazelles move in to eat the newly exposed and more nutritional short grasses. Since their different complementary preferences of forage, Grant's Zebras and Blue Wildebeests often move and forage together.

A saw the various gazelles and antelopes (Thomson's Gazelles (Eudorcas thomsonii, german: Thomson-Gazelle, french: Gazelle de Thomson), Southern Grant's Gazelles (Nanger granti granti, german: Südliche Grant-Gazelle, french: Gazelle de Grant), Common Impala (Aepyceros melampus melampus, german: Schwarzfersen­antilope, french: Impala), and others). I even saw East African Eland Antelopes (Taurotragus oryx pattersonianus, german: Elenantilope, french: Éland), the largest antelopes. The Eland are very shy and don't let you get close. My guide told me that the reason for that is the fact that they don't have much running endurance, they can't run away from predators for too long. They therefore avoid anything that they don't like and don't let anything come close.

All pictures are © Dr. Günther Eichhorn, unless otherwise noted.

Large animals

Pedetes surdaster
East African Springhare (Pedetes surdaster). This is a strange looking animal, it looks like a cross between a hare and a kangaroo. Unfortunately I didn't get a sharp picture at night with the Springhare running. (537k)
Procavia capensis
Rock Hyrax (Procavia capensis, german: Klippschliefer, french: Daman du Cap). (898k)
Procavia capensis
Rock Hyrax (Procavia capensis, german: Klippschliefer, french: Daman du Cap). (743k)
Mungos mungo
Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo, german: Zebramanguste, french: Mangouste rayée). (804k)
Mungos mungo
Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo, german: Zebramanguste, french: Mangouste rayée). (1130k)
Madoqua kirkii cavendishi
Cavendish's Dik-dik (Madoqua kirkii cavendishi, german: Kirk-Dikdik, french: Dik-dik de Kirk). (941k)
Nanger granti granti
Male Southern Grant's Gazelles (Nanger granti granti, german: Südliche Grant-Gazelle, french: Gazelle de Grant). Note the white tail. This distinguishes them from Thomson's Gazelles. (829k)
Nanger granti granti
Male Southern Grant's Gazelles (Nanger granti granti, german: Südliche Grant-Gazelle, french: Gazelle de Grant). (693k)
Eudorcas thomsonii
Male Thomson's Gazelles (Eudorcas thomsonii, german: Thomson-Gazelle, french: Gazelle de Thomson), note the dark tail. In the middle is a Grant's Gazelle with the white tail. (850k)
Male Thomson's Gazelle
Male Thomson's Gazelle. (1018k)
Redunca redunca
Male Bohor Reedbuck (Redunca redunca, german: Riedbock, french: Cobe des roseaux). (720k)
Young Male Bohor Reedbuck
Young male Bohor Reedbuck. (842k)
Redunca redunca
Female Bohor Reedbuck (Redunca redunca, german: Riedbock, french: Cobe des roseaux). (964k)
Aepyceros melampus melampus
Common Impala harem (Aepyceros melampus melampus, german: Schwarzfersen­antilope, french: Impala). The male is on the right. (1239k)
Common Impala Harem
Common Impala harem. (1237k)
Aepyceros melampus melampus
Female and baby Common Impalas (Aepyceros melampus melampus, german: Schwarzfersen­antilope, french: Impala). (1023k)
Male Common Impala
Male Common Impala. (875k)
Aepyceros melampus melampus
Male Common Impala (Aepyceros melampus melampus, german: Schwarzfersen­antilope, french: Impala). (920k)
Kobus ellipsiprymnus defassa
Male Defassa Waterbucks (Kobus ellipsiprymnus defassa, german: Defassa-Wasserbock, french: Cobe à croissant). (1161k)
Kobus ellipsiprymnus defassa
Closer view of the male Defassa Waterbucks (Kobus ellipsiprymnus defassa, german: Defassa-Wasserbock, french: Cobe à croissant). (926k)
Alcelaphus buselaphus cokii
Herd of Kongonis (Alcelaphus buselaphus cokii, french: Bubale roux). (841k)
Alcelaphus buselaphus cokii
Kongoni (Alcelaphus buselaphus cokii, french: Bubale roux). (443k)
Taurotragus oryx pattersonianus
East African Elands (Taurotragus oryx pattersonianus, german: Elenantilope, french: Éland), the largest antelopes, among a herd of Western White-bearded Wildebeests (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi, german: Streifengnu, french: Gnou bleu). They are very shy, they don't let you get close. (596k)
Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi
Heat reflections of a herd of migrating Western White-bearded Wildebeests (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi, german: Streifengnu, french: Gnou bleu). (538k)
Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi
Migrating Western White-bearded Wildebeests (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi, german: Streifengnu, french: Gnou bleu). (899k)
Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi
Migrating Western White-bearded Wildebeests (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi, german: Streifengnu, french: Gnou bleu). (882k)
Migrating Western White-bearded Wildebeests
Migrating Western White-bearded Wildebeests. These were walking through Ndutu Lake. It is a soda lake, so the water is not drinkable. (717k)
Spooked Our Car
These got spooked by our car. (660k)
Western White-bearded Wildebeests Coming
Western White-bearded Wildebeests coming out of the lake to continue their migration. (702k)
Mixed Herd Western White-bearded
Mixed herd of Western White-bearded Wildebeests and Grant's Zebras, moving from the lake up the hill. (904k)
Migrating Ndutu Lake Valley
Migrating out of the Ndutu Lake valley. (1045k)
Equus quagga boehmi
Migrating out of the Ndutu Lake valley. There are frequently Grant's Zebras (Equus quagga boehmi, german: Steppenzebra, french: Zèbre de Grant) with the Wildebeest. (911k)
Western White-bearded Wildebeests Babies
Western White-bearded Wildebeests with babies, mixed with Zebras. (1004k)
Wildebeest Walk Single File
Wildebeest walk in single file most of the time. (898k)
Crocuta crocuta
Western White-bearded Wildebeest Stampede. They got spooked by some Spotted Hyenas (Crocuta crocuta, german: Tüpfelhyäne, french: Hyène tachetée), and just kept running. There were hundreds of them running past us. (1044k)
Migrating Western White-bearded Wildebeests
Migrating Western White-bearded Wildebeests with babies. (753k)
Resting Western White-bearded Wildebeest
Resting Western White-bearded Wildebeest. (959k)
Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi
Female Western White-bearded Wildebeest with baby (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi, german: Streifengnu, french: Gnou bleu). (833k)
Looked Water But Soda
They looked at the water, but the soda lake has no drinkable water. (714k)
Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi
Closer view of Western White-bearded Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus mearnsi, german: Streifengnu, french: Gnou bleu). (750k)
Equus quagga boehmi
Migrating herd of Grant's Zebras (Equus quagga boehmi, german: Steppenzebra, french: Zèbre de Grant). (666k)
Mixed Herd Grant's Zebras
Mixed herd with Grant's Zebras, Western White-bearded Wildebeests, and Eland Antelopes. (661k)
Grant's Zebras Female Common
Grant's Zebras, with a female Common Impala and Eastern Warthogs in the background. (1091k)
Equus quagga boehmi
Grant's Zebras (Equus quagga boehmi, german: Steppenzebra, french: Zèbre de Grant). (1079k)
Equus quagga boehmi
Female Grant's Zebra with baby (Equus quagga boehmi, german: Steppenzebra, french: Zèbre de Grant). (1194k)
Equus quagga boehmi
Close-up of a Grant's Zebra (Equus quagga boehmi, german: Steppenzebra, french: Zèbre de Grant). (873k)
Phacochoerus africanus massaicus
Fleeing Eastern Warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus massaicus, german: Warzenschwein, french: Phacochère). (668k)
Phacochoerus africanus massaicus
Eastern Warthog mother with baby (Phacochoerus africanus massaicus, german: Warzenschwein, french: Phacochère). (883k)
Three Baby Eastern Warthogs
Three baby Eastern Warthogs. (881k)
Eastern Warthogs Run Point
When Eastern Warthogs run, they point up their tail. (915k)
Phacochoerus africanus massaicus
Their tusks are formidable weapons. Even Hyenas make respectfully way for an Eastern Warthog (Phacochoerus africanus massaicus, german: Warzenschwein, french: Phacochère). (938k)
Phacochoerus africanus massaicus
These Eastern Warthog tusks are even bigger (Phacochoerus africanus massaicus, german: Warzenschwein, french: Phacochère). (879k)
Chlorocebus pygerythrus hilgerti
Hilgert's Vervet Monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus hilgerti, german: Südliche Grünmeerkatze, french: Vervet bleu). (817k)
Chlorocebus pygerythrus hilgerti
Hilgert's Vervet Monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus hilgerti, german: Südliche Grünmeerkatze, french: Vervet bleu). (929k)
Chlorocebus pygerythrus hilgerti
Hilgert's Vervet Monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus hilgerti, german: Südliche Grünmeerkatze, french: Vervet bleu). (640k)
Hilgert's Vervet Monkey Climbing
Hilgert's Vervet Monkey climbing in a tree. (685k)
Papio anubis
Troop of Olive Baboons (Papio anubis, german: Anubispavian, french: Babouin olive) in a tree. (1265k)
Papio anubis
Olive Baboon (Papio anubis, german: Anubispavian, french: Babouin olive). (934k)
Papio anubis
Grooming Olive Baboons (Papio anubis, german: Anubispavian, french: Babouin olive). (700k)
Olive Baboon Tree
Olive Baboon in a tree. (621k)
Baby Baboon
Baby baboon. (714k)
Papio anubis
Nursing baby Olive Baboon (Papio anubis, german: Anubispavian, french: Babouin olive). (625k)
Crocodylus niloticus africanus
East African Crocodiles (or East African Crocodile) (Crocodylus niloticus africanus, german: Nilkrokodil, french: Crocodile du Nil). (895k)
Crocodylus niloticus africanus
East African Crocodile, showing its teeth (Crocodylus niloticus africanus, german: Nilkrokodil, french: Crocodile du Nil). (1039k)
African Crocodile Water
African Crocodile in the water. (746k)
African Crocodile Water
African Crocodile in the water. (680k)
Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi
Maasai Giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi, german: Massai-Giraffe, french: Girafe Masaï). (1231k)
Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi
Maasai Giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi, german: Massai-Giraffe, french: Girafe Masaï). (1141k)
Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi
Running Maasai Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi, german: Massai-Giraffe, french: Girafe Masaï). They look awkward, but can run pretty fast. (728k)
Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi
Feeding Maasai Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi, german: Massai-Giraffe, french: Girafe Masaï). (999k)
Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi
Close-up of a Maasai Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi, german: Massai-Giraffe, french: Girafe Masaï). (662k)
Close-up Two Maasai Giraffes
Close-up of two Maasai Giraffes. (777k)
Look Over Tree
They can look over the tree. (761k)
Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi
Maasai Giraffe with baby (Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi, german: Massai-Giraffe, french: Girafe Masaï). (845k)
Syncerus caffer caffer
Herd of Cape Buffaloes (Syncerus caffer caffer, german: Kaffernbüffel, french: Buffle d'Afrique). They come sometimes in large herds, but more often there were just a few together. (676k)
Buphagus africanus
Cape Buffalo with Eastern Warthogs in the back. Both have Yellow-billed Oxpeckers (Buphagus africanus, german: Gelbschnabel-Madenhacker, french: Piquebœuf à bec jaune) sitting on them. (1294k)
Syncerus caffer caffer
Cape Buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer, german: Kaffernbüffel, french: Buffle d'Afrique) in a wallow with two Yellow-billed Oxpeckers (Buphagus africanus, german: Gelbschnabel-Madenhacker, french: Piquebœuf à bec jaune). (1067k)
Cape Buffalo Wallow Three
Cape Buffalo just out of a wallow with three Yellow-billed Oxpeckers. (1172k)
Syncerus caffer caffer
Cape Buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer, german: Kaffernbüffel, french: Buffle d'Afrique) staring at us again. Buffaloes frequently stared at us, which was a bit disconcerting, since they are pretty aggressive animals. (1084k)
Syncerus caffer caffer
Close-up of an Cape Buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer, german: Kaffernbüffel, french: Buffle d'Afrique). (860k)
Hippopotamus amphibius
A group of Hippopotamuses (Hippopotamus amphibius, german: Flusspferd, french: Hippopotame amphibie), with Western Cattle Egrets (Bubulcus ibis ibis, german: Kuhreiher, french: Héron garde-bœufs) standing on their backs. (783k)
Hippopotamus amphibius
Closer view of the Hippos (Hippopotamus amphibius, german: Flusspferd, french: Hippopotame amphibie). (726k)
Hippo Pool Dead Hippo
Another Hippo pool. There is a dead Hippo in the background. (979k)
Hippopotamus amphibius
Close-up of a partially submerged Hippo (Hippopotamus amphibius, german: Flusspferd, french: Hippopotame amphibie). (654k)
Hippo Land Playing Host
Hippo on land, playing host to a bunch of Yellow-billed Oxpeckers. Hippos are said to be the animals that kill most humans in Africa. They are very aggressive and territorial. (814k)
Hippopotamus amphibius
Hippo showing its teeth (Hippopotamus amphibius, german: Flusspferd, french: Hippopotame amphibie). (744k)
Fighting Hippos
Fighting Hippos. (729k)
Dead Hippo African Crocodile
Dead Hippo. There is an African Crocodile behind it, presumably trying to feed on the Hippo. (882k)
Loxodonta africana
African Bush Elephant Herd (Loxodonta africana, german: Afrikanischer Elefant, french: Éléphant de savane d'Afrique). There were about 100 Elephants in that area. They sometimes migrate together. Individual families are much smaller, usually only on the order of 10-20 Elephants. (1115k)
Loxodonta africana
African Bush Elephant family walking, with several babies (Loxodonta africana, german: Afrikanischer Elefant, french: Éléphant de savane d'Afrique). (881k)
African Bush Elephant Family
African Bush Elephant family, finding shade under a tree. (1115k)
African Bush Elephants
African Bush Elephants. (822k)
African Bush Elephant Mother
African Bush Elephant mother with baby. (945k)
Loxodonta africana
African Bush Elephant baby (Loxodonta africana, german: Afrikanischer Elefant, french: Éléphant de savane d'Afrique). (1027k)
Loxodonta africana
Adult African Bush Elephant (Loxodonta africana, german: Afrikanischer Elefant, french: Éléphant de savane d'Afrique). (996k)
Feeding Elephant
Feeding Elephant. (1028k)
Feeding Elephant
Feeding Elephant. (956k)
Loxodonta africana
Close-up of an African Bush Elephant (Loxodonta africana, german: Afrikanischer Elefant, french: Éléphant de savane d'Afrique). (901k)
Elephant Flapping Ears
Elephant flapping his ears. (741k)
Close-up Feeding Elephant
Close-up of feeding Elephant. (1064k)
Close-up Feeding Elephant
Close-up of feeding Elephant. (1329k)
Close-up Elephant
Close-up of an Elephant. (785k)
Elephant Part Trunk Wondering
This Elephant lost part of its trunk. I was wondering how he was feeding, but he seemed to be in good shape. (747k)
Crocuta crocuta
Spotted Hyena (Crocuta crocuta, german: Tüpfelhyäne, french: Hyène tachetée). (991k)
Crocuta crocuta
Running Spotted Hyena (Crocuta crocuta, german: Tüpfelhyäne, french: Hyène tachetée). (951k)
Acinonyx jubatus jubatus
Southeast African Cheetah mother with four cubs (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus, german: Gepard, french: Guépard d'Afrique australe). They had just finished feeding on a Reedbuck. Cheetahs don't keep an animal that they have killed (like Leopards do). They eat their fill and then they move on. (967k)
Acinonyx jubatus jubatus
Feeding Southeast African Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus, german: Gepard, french: Guépard d'Afrique australe). You can see the carcass. (1026k)
Southeast African Cheetah Cub
Southeast African Cheetah cub. The cubs were about nine months old. (676k)
Southeast African Cheetah Mother
Southeast African Cheetah mother. (1037k)
Acinonyx jubatus jubatus
Southeast African Cheetah mother watching (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus, german: Gepard, french: Guépard d'Afrique australe). (962k)
Southeast African Cheetah Cub
Southeast African Cheetah cub affectionately greeting the mother. (740k)
Acinonyx jubatus jubatus
Southeast African Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus, german: Gepard, french: Guépard d'Afrique australe). (1177k)
Acinonyx jubatus jubatus
Yawning Southeast African Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus, german: Gepard, french: Guépard d'Afrique australe). (1147k)
Acinonyx jubatus jubatus
Close-up of a Southeast African Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus, german: Gepard, french: Guépard d'Afrique australe). (974k)
Panthera pardus pardus
African Leopard (Panthera pardus pardus, german: Leopard, french: Léopard d'Afrique) in a tree. (993k)
African Leopard Tree
African Leopard in a tree. (839k)
African Leopard Tree
African Leopard in a tree. (783k)
African Leopard
African Leopard. (945k)
Panthera pardus pardus
African Leopard (Panthera pardus pardus, german: Leopard, french: Léopard d'Afrique). (1024k)
Panthera pardus pardus
African Leopard (Panthera pardus pardus, german: Leopard, french: Léopard d'Afrique). (1091k)
Panthera leo melanochaita
Southern Lion couple (Panthera leo melanochaita, german: Löwe, french: Lion) greeting. (839k)
Panthera leo melanochaita
Two male bachelor Southern Lions (Panthera leo melanochaita, german: Löwe, french: Lion). (950k)
Young Male Southern Lion
Young male Southern Lion. (822k)
Panthera leo melanochaita
Female Southern Lion (Panthera leo melanochaita, german: Löwe, french: Lion). (840k)
Panthera leo melanochaita
Male Southern Lion (Panthera leo melanochaita, german: Löwe, french: Lion). (905k)
Panthera leo melanochaita
Close-up of young male Southern Lion (Panthera leo melanochaita, german: Löwe, french: Lion). (1092k)
Panthera leo melanochaita
Close-up of young female Southern Lion (Panthera leo melanochaita, german: Löwe, french: Lion). (929k)
Female Lion Drinking Road
Female Lion drinking on the road. (1109k)
Lions Walked Right Past
The Lions walked right past all the cars, completely ignoring them. They just don't realize that there is food on top of those cars  :-) (768k)
Female Lion Right Next
Female Lion, right next to the cars. (995k)
Lion Tree Really Must
This Lion was up in a tree. That really must tick of the Leopards, since normally Leopards are safe from Lions in a tree. (1055k)
Collared Female Lion
Collared female Lion. (774k)

Miscellaneous

Chamu Rio Tallest Mountain
Chamu Rio, the tallest mountain in the area, northwest of the Serengeti. (512k)
Way Kenya Serengeti
On the way from Kenya to the Serengeti. (666k)
Local Village
Local village. (786k)
Pedestrian
Pedestrian. (611k)
Local Pastoralists
Local pastoralists. (485k)
Permanent Tent Ikoma Tented
Permanent tent in the Ikoma Tented Camp. (755k)
Interior Comfortable "tent"
Interior of the comfortable "tent". (629k)
Bathroom Tent Solid Walls
Bathroom in the tent has solid walls and hot and cold water. The hot water took half a day to fix, but it eventually worked. (591k)
Unit Serengeti Serena Lodge
Unit in the Serengeti Serena Lodge. The rooms were very nice. (1359k)
Cloths Hanging Everywhere Rid
These cloths were hanging everywhere. They are there to get rid of tsetse flies. They are impregnated with insecticide. The blue color and movement attract tsetse flies and the insecticide kills them. (1002k)
Tourist Vehicles Serengeti Headquarters
Tourist vehicles at the Serengeti Headquarters. (873k)
Vehicle
This was my vehicle. (643k)
Traffic Jam Leopard Something
Traffic jam at the leopard. When something interesting is to see, all the vehicles congregate. It gets pretty difficult to move the cars. (838k)
All Tour Operators Operate
Not all tour operators operate the Toyota Landcruisers. I am glad I didn't end up in one of these buses. (624k)
Hurry To Next Site
In a hurry to get to the next site. (581k)
Dirt Strip Serengeti
There is a dirt strip in the Serengeti. (642k)
View Part Serengeti National
View of a part of the Serengeti National Park that is a bit more wooded. (747k)
Typical View Serengeti
Typical view of the Serengeti. (684k)
Parts Even Less Trees
Some parts have even less trees. (644k)
Road Serengeti Towards Ngorongoro
The road in the Serengeti towards Ngorongoro Crater. (887k)
Sunrise Serengeti
Sunrise in the Serengeti. (640k)
Vachellia tortilis
An Umbrella Thorn (Vachellia tortilis, german: Schirmakazie, french: Acacia faux-gommier) and a Flat Top Acacia (Vachellia abyssinica). You have to guess which one is which  :-) (858k)
Small "kopje" Serengeti Name
Small "Kopje" in the Serengeti. The name Kopje comes from the Dutch word for head. These outcrops are basalt intrusions into the sediment layer. When the sediment layers erode, the basalt formations remain. (853k)
Large "kopje"
A large "Kopje". (1028k)
Aloe vera
Aloe (Aloe vera, german: Echte Aloe, french: Aloè des Barbades). (1439k)
Flowering Agave
Flowering Agave. (795k)
Vachellia drepanolobium
Whistling Thorn (Vachellia drepanolobium). (1261k)
Thorns Galls Whistling Acacia
Thorns and galls of the Whistling Acacia. The galls about 2.5 cm (1.0") in diameter. Stinging ants live in these galls. The ants seem to protect the acacia, which doesn't have toxic chemicals to ward off insect pests. When the wind blows over old, abandoned galls, they can act like flutes and produce a whistling sound. (793k)
Senegalia mellifera
Black Thorn (Senegalia mellifera, german: Schwarzdorn-Akazie). (1269k)
Senegalia mellifera
Flowers of a Black Thorn (Senegalia mellifera, german: Schwarzdorn-Akazie). (593k)
Vachellia xanthophloea
An African Elephant and a Yellow Fever Tree (Vachellia xanthophloea, german: Gelbrinden-Akazie, french: Arbre à fièvre). (1124k)
Palm Trees Along Little
Palm trees along a little brook in the Serengeti. (1141k)
Rainbow Over Serengeti
Rainbow over the Serengeti. (588k)
Euphorbia candelabrum
A rainbow behind a Tree Euphorbia (Euphorbia candelabrum, french: Euphorbe candélabre). (854k)
Kigelia africana
Sausage Tree (Kigelia africana, german: Leberwurstbaum, french: Arbre à saucisses). (1077k)
Flower
Flower. (497k)
Flower
Flower. (580k)
Flower
Flower. (807k)
Ipomoea obscura
Obscure Morning Glory (Ipomoea obscura). (679k)
Hippopotamus amphibius
Bones of a Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius, german: Flusspferd, french: Hippopotame amphibie). (851k)
Mud Wallow Wallows Used
Mud wallow. These wallows are used by buffalo, warthogs, and hyenas. (1125k)
Termite Mounds
Termite mounds. (751k)
Dorylus sp.
Marching Driver Ants (Dorylus sp., german: Treiberameisen). (1381k)
Close-up Driver Ants
Close-up of the Driver Ants. (1406k)
Spider
Spider. (710k)
Blister Beetle
Blister beetle. (494k)
Trichonephila senegalensis
Spider web of a Banded-legged Golden Orb-web Spider (Trichonephila senegalensis). (1008k)
Trichonephila senegalensis
Banded-legged Golden Orb-web Spider (Trichonephila senegalensis). (573k)
Trichonephila senegalensis
Banded-legged Golden Orb-web Spider (Trichonephila senegalensis). (541k)
Morning Dew Spider Web
Morning dew on a spider web. (712k)
Gecko
Gecko. (986k)
Agama mwanzae
Mwanza Flat-headed Rock Agama (Agama mwanzae, german: Stahlblaue Felsenagame). (676k)
Chamaeleo dilepis
Flap-necked Chameleon (Chamaeleo dilepis, german: Lappenchamäleon, french: Caméléon Bilobé). (1238k)
Chamaeleo dilepis
Flap-necked Chameleon (Chamaeleo dilepis, german: Lappenchamäleon, french: Caméléon Bilobé). (721k)
Chamaeleo dilepis
Close-up of the Flap-necked Chameleon (Chamaeleo dilepis, german: Lappenchamäleon, french: Caméléon Bilobé) with the eye pointing forward. (777k)
Chamaeleo dilepis
Close-up of the Flap-necked Chameleon (Chamaeleo dilepis, german: Lappenchamäleon, french: Caméléon Bilobé) with the eye pointing back. (715k)

This page contains 188 pictures with 38 species

Tanzania
Main page for Tanzania

Page last updated on Fri Jun 4 17:50:48 2021 (Mountain Standard Time)


Tanzania - Serengeti Wildlife on gei.aerobaticsweb.org


© Dr. Günther Eichhorn
Retired
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